Delicious Bites and Top-Notch Cocktails in Elegant Sadie, Hollywood

The Lounge at Sadie

I was at Sadie last night with some good girlfriend-bloggers – about a week past its official opening. It was a belated discovery that the cocktails at Sadie, curated by Giovanni Martinez, are pretty tasty. Having known Giovanni is a cocktail sleuth behind the bar thanks to his extensive travels, I was definitely not disappointed by the range and execution of the drink menu.

The Sadie Float

Although the crust on the flatbreads were overcooked and tough, the main entrees were way better than I might expect from a Hollywood Boulevard spot. (I’m truly enjoying each time I’m surprised by my own neighborhood, by the way.) Dave Schmit’s Scottish Salmon, Jidori Chicken (with delicious spätzel) and Spinach Pasta were all enjoyed by my dinner companions and myself.

But on those cocktails. My favorite of the night was the White Monk, made with white pepper & cardamom-infused Dolin Blanc Vermouth, silver tequila, Castilian bitters and Benedictine rinse. I love tequila, but this is the cocktail to erase all those college Jose Cuervo memories that have soured some drinkers towards tequila forever. It’s beautifully fragrant and extra smooth going down.

Black & White

But there’s nothing like a secret cocktail menu to spice up a stint at the supper club. Off Giovanni’s public list is “The Badger,” a unique drink made with reposado tequila, egg white and Miracle Mile bitters. But my favorite off this secret menu was definitely The Sadie Float. It’s made with Campari-flavored soda, Peychaud ice cream and, of course, Campari.

Looking at it, you’d think it was the typical, sweet cocktail made sweeter by the fact that it also has ice cream. Once you taste it, you discover pure Italian genius. It’s fizzy, slightly bitter and yet creamy. And it’s pure heaven. Hint: Don’t get it if you don’t like Campari.

Sadie Courtyard

While you’re there, you have plenty of perspectives to choose from as far as seating as the entire interior is pleasing. Sit in the front foyer bar area, dubbed the Parlour, for some darker hues and modern angles. The middle Lounge provides more of a speakeasy feel while the stone effaced Courtyard in back is probably one of the most beautiful patios I’ve seen in all of Hollywood. (Heat lamps are plentiful, if not in overabundance, back here.)

But you’d be committing a crime if you were to leave Sadie without having dessert. Their Peanut Butter & Jelly Ice Cream Sandwich is out of this world, as is their Black & White, or flourless chocolate cake complete with white chocolate ice cream on the side. The “clutch” dessert, however, at this spot is the Homemade Donuts and Irish Coffee Cream.

You won’t visit Sadie for the bargain, but like most places in Hollywood, for the atmosphere which thankfully is not a detractor from the food and cocktails, but instead an enhancement. The food has the potential to stand all on its own while the cocktails make Sadie a destination. Forget Les Deux I, II and IX; hopefully Sadie, with its multi-faceted interior and approach, is here to stay.

All food and cocktails were hosted.

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Dinner:

Tue -Wed: 5:30 – 11 PM
Thur – Sat: 5:30 PM – 1 AM

Bar:

Tue – Wed 5:30 – 11 PM
Thur – Sat 5:30 PM – 2 AM

Sadie
1638 N. Las Palmas Ave.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323.467.0200

Pumpkin-palooza at Blue Palms Brewhouse: Saturday, October 29, 2011

Mmm. Pumpkin Beer. | Photo courtesy of NorthwestBeerguide on Flickr

LA Beer Week(s) may be over, but Halloween’s not – and neither is your thirst for beer, I hear. When is it, ever? Why not combine the two by making a stop at my favorite neighborhood pub, Blue Palms Brewhouse, tomorrow starting 2 PM?

You’ll get to quench your thirst and craving for pumpkin with these special brews:

  • Dogfish Head Punkin’
  • Midnight Sun TREAT
  • The Bruery Barrel Aged Autumn Maple (bottle)
  • The Bruery Autumn Maple
  • 2010 Beer Valley Jackalope Imperial Pumpkin Porter
  • Sam Adams Double Pumpkin
  • Bootleggers Pumpkin Ale
  • New Belgium Kick (Sour Pumpkin Cranberry Ale)
  • Kern River Brewing Pumpkin AleShipyard Smashed Pumpkin

And the food menu will be embellished with these autumn goodies:

  • Pumpkin Salad: Spiced Pumpkin, Lentils, & Goat Cheese
  • Pumpkin Quesadilla: Pumpkin, Feta, & cilantro

Who needs to turn into a pumpkin at the end of the night when you can drink them at the duration, instead? See you at Pumpkin-palooza!

Oh, right: Happy Halloween, too!

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Saturday, October 29, 2011

Pumpkin-palooza: 2 PM

Kitchen: Closes 12 AM

Bar: Closes 2 AM

Blue Palms Brewhouse
6124 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323.464.0808

First Taste: Tsukemen at Ikemen, Hollywood

Johnny Dip (topped with pork)

I love all the Metro L.A. expansions the noodle shops have been undergoing, lately. When I say lately, I mean especially within the past month or two. After all, I was never quite a South Bay (or Daikokuya) kind of gal.

"Eat ramen here." Okay.

Yamadaya in Culver City. Shin-sen-gumi in Little Tokyo. Robata Jinya is even within the same proximity to my workplace as Ramen Jinya is to my Hollywood apartment. Ikemen itself is not an expansion, but another project of Yasumasa Kawabata and Sean Nakamura – the latter of Ramen California fame.

But Ikemen. I can walk there.

I’m lucky because the parking at this plaza, quite frankly, is as horrendous as you might expect parking would be for any establishment at the Hollywood Boulevard and La Brea Avenue intersection. I went solo the other night and sat at the counter beneath several sticks of bonito. Equipped with the knowledge that tsukemen (dipping noodles) is their specialty, I ordered the Johnny Dip topped with pork (chicken is your other option). The dipping sauce is described as “Tonkotsu au jus mixed with green onions and Italian basil.” The non-traditional flavor was very good in that familiarly super rich way. Of course, the basil flavor was the most novel thing about it. The noodles were thick – all the better texture to sop up that delicious dipping broth.

Pre-shaven Bonito

My next visit will be soon, and I’ve already decided on the Zebra Dip tsukemen, flavored with slowly roasted garlic. Only after then might I venture into traditional (or “genuine,” as Ikemen labels it) noodles in broth. Perhaps those recipes are from Ramen California?

Oh, Hollywood. The best part about this ramen movement is that finally, ramen as drunk food really will become a reality. That is, really good ramen – and not just the dehydrated form we’ve all grown up with. Ikemen is open until 12 AM on the weekdays and 4 AM on Fridays and Saturdays. With all the flack L.A. gets about last call and lack of late night food, Japanese noodles may turn out to be my saving grace.

Further reading - Ikemen Ramen: Now Open + Bringing Hollywood Cool to Japanese Noodles – LA Weekly Squid Ink

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Mon – Thu

12 – 2 PM, 6 PM – 12 AM

Fri

12 – 2 PM, 6 PM – 4 AM

Sat

6 PM – 4 AM

Cash only

Ikemen
1655 N. La Brea Ave.
Hollywood, CA 90028
323.800.7669

Wood & Vine: That Cozy, Warm Space on Hollywood Boulevard

Upstairs View of Bar Area

Hollywood is an awesome place to live. Not because of the bottle service and certainly not because everyone drives in from The Valley and Orange County on the weekends for the purposes of said bottle service.

Chicken & Waffles with Maple-Roasted Squash ($14)

It’s a great place because of the very spots that are overlooked in favor of bottle service and bass. Currently entering the second month of its operation, Wood & Vine is a two-story, neighborhood spot at which you can meet up with your friends and enjoy wine, beer, cocktails and/or food in a pleasant setting with wood furnishings and sage interior. There’s also a beautiful patio in the back – complete with lighting, ambiance and open flame – that may give you inklings of New York City thanks to the surrounding Hollywood “skyscrapers.”

The food is created by Gavin Mills, who was last sous at Bastide under Joseph Mahon (see previous post). As done in more and more eateries out there, he employs snout to tail and locally sourcing philosophies in that small kitchen and does a great job doing so. All the charcuterie, pates and rillette are made in-house, and together with cheese, start at $8 for three, $12 for five and $15 for seven.

Potato Gnocchi | Pea Tendrils, Spring Garlic, Confit Onions, Truffle ($12)

I sampled about half of the small, manageable menu (I’m all for quality execution over spreading oneself thin while indulging indecisiveness) and, of everything I tried, came up with a handful of favorites. The chicken and waffles was a refreshing rendition, with fluffy breading surrounding a sparingly syruped quarter-chicken over a bona fide, house-made Belgian waffle. The maple-roasted squash was delicious, too, with the $14 serving being none-too-sweet. Just perfect, actually.

The gnocchi were savory pillows, accompanied by pea tendrils, spring garlic, confit onions and just a touch of truffle. Beautifully simple and delicious. And if you want a little twist on traditional lasagna, Wood & Vine’s oxtail variety comes in its own, adorable Pyrex glass with horseradish and house-made ricotta – and packs a subtle, but much appreciated, kick.

But oh, those scallops. Granted, you have to screw things up really bad if you turn out bad scallops, but not only are these huge babies perfectly seared (with that crispy, barely-charred exterior), they come accompanied with Jerusalem artichokes upon some deliciously truffled grits. There was nothing left on the plate when I was finished – not even a smear of grits.

Grilled Scallops | Truffled Grits, Jerusalem Artichokes ($16)

I have yet to go back and try more cocktails (headed up by Jason McBeth) on for size. The Manhattan I ordered was good once I requested that it be served straight up (since it was initially served on-the-rocks), but I’m thinking that since I went early, they’re still getting their program squared away. However, their brown (whiskeys, ryes, bourbons, what have you) selection looks somewhat extensive, so I can’t wait to take a closer look. The dessert menu looks enticing, too, if also humanitarian, with proceeds from the sales of profiteroles going directly to the Los Angeles Youth Network – a cause that the owners care about. Another dessert that caught my eye: Butterscotch pot de creme with salted caramel ice-cream. Mmm.

The guys behind Wood & Vine, despite the big space, did a great job at creating a warm ambiance and concentrated food and cocktail menu with only the necessities. It’s the place that nightclub birds walk past on their way to Hi-NRG spicy tuna wonderland while you’re inside, cozy while nibbling cheese and sipping on your Aviation – perhaps alone, perhaps in a group (because it’s big enough for that).

Please, keep walking.

All food, wine and cocktails were hosted.

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Wood & Vine
6280 Hollywood Blvd
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323.334.3360

Loaded Bar Serves Up Frysmith With a Side of Rock

Loaded Bar

I love a delicious, complex cocktail as much as the next guy but sometimes you just want something that’s a little more simple. Rugged. Or even rough.

Poor Picture of Frysmith Kimchi Fries ($7, or $8.50 for "Loaded" version with pork belly)

Thankfully, I live in Hollywood so I have plenty of selection to suit my needs and desires of the moment. And yeah, I was craving something a lot less maintenance than a $14 hand-crafted cocktail plus an easy snack that would satisfy my belly. So I decided to check out Frysmith’s new cover band, Loaded Rock Bar on Hollywood Blvd, which serves up their menu without the gas ‘n go truck and with the stationary bar seating, lone flatscreen and nostalgic-to-the-80’s, rocker-esque soundtrack.

I’ll admit: The key is visiting on Call Whiskey Wednesdays, whereby all call whiskey is $3 per shot (If you prefer Jager, go on Mondays; tequila and Tecates, go on Thursdays). And so Makers it was, for me, which accompanied an order of Loaded Kimchi Fries with pork belly.

Beautiful. The fries were of a perfect crisp and the kimchi was more respectable than I’d honestly give a rock bar credit for. It would be hard to say if they’d be even better if cooked on the original truck. Thank you, Loaded, for proving me wrong. It’s apparent that the place provides its customers with a solid bar-going experience without the BS. They also have a cheap food menu besides the Frysmith menu, which I have yet to try, but which also comes with little risk ($5 for a burger on Hollywood Blvd? Wow!). But if you’re not hungry, count on Loaded for the whiskeys and bourbons – including even Death’s Door White Whiskey, Woodford Reserve and Basil Hayden ($7 ea). Or Macallan 12 for $8, if you were thinking something sweeter. Highland Park 12 and even Balvenie 12 are even $8 per pour.

Thinking about fitting in? A $5 PBR 24-oz pounder should be right up your alley. If you want to play middle-of-the-aisle, they also have $4 bottled Red Stripe. Are you a daytime drinker? All drinks are 2 for $1 more from 11 AM – 7 PM. Whoa.

Not bad for a rock bar with fake Marshall Loaded amps lining the back wall.

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Loaded
6377 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA
323.464.5623

Harvard & Stone Makes Bunker Drinking Beautiful

Main Bar at Harvard & Stone

If you were to hear that the guys behind La Descarga are opening up a new bar, it’s high time to put the opening of said bar on your calendar. So, that’s what I did. I was happy to find out in the process that Harvard & Stone is the next-best thing to walking distance from my digs; it’s two Metro stops and a skip away. And when I visited the WWII-esque bar last night for the opening, I found out it’s actually across the street from Sanamluang – that Thai establishment holding remnants of college nostalgia and my go-to place for Pad Kee Mow. It’s also open until 3 AM.

Mia Sarazen says, "You Can Do It!"

I see cocktails and late-night Thai food in my near future.

Back to Harvard & Stone, so-named after the intersection of Harvard and its stone exterior on Hollywood Boulevard: It’s a beautiful space. Though Steve Livigni corrected me about the decor: “Oh, it’s contrived,” I offered that it did a great job pretending that it wasn’t (it’s all in the incandescent lighting). He finally agreed. The distressed walls with exposed brick frame a centralized, rectangular front bar lined with old, hanging metal shelves suspended by chain links. Liquor bottles artfully sit atop them while glasswares hang below. Antique pieces like obsolete, rusty machinery and light bulbs are scattered along the bar and in display cases on the inside wall. High-top, metal tables with rusty rivets line those cases, should cocktailers want to be near the action but not right in it. By the door is a stage on which Livigni welcomes bands to perform should the “impromptu show” mood strike. Keep an eye on this place for any post-show after-parties. Before Harvard & Stone, industrial never seemed so hip.

Back Bar

In the back corner is an old, rustic fireplace where guests can crowd around and across the way, a private room partitioned off by antiqued, double sliding doors. And I can’t wait to peep the balcony, which wasn’t ready for the opening, but which also extends into the back “Test Kitchen” bar area which is half-open and coded for smoking. (Fortunately, there’s also a dedicated, narrow outdoor smoking patio, Eastside bar-style, for the committed smokers.)

But, oh…that Test Kitchen bar in the back! Every month, a certain spirit (February: Whiskey, March: Gin) will be featured in the cocktails on its unique menu, which is to change daily. Whatever the spirit, American distillates are the focus. According to Caroline on Crack in her LA Weekly Squid Ink article, this bar will also “stock a small menu of tequila, cognac and rum as well as recognizable brands.” For now, you can count on Elijah Craig, Fighting Cock and Evan Williams Bourbon to be stocked here.

Pablo Moix

The cocktail menu earns its Eastside cred with an Appletini Apple Martini made with Original Moonshine (apple syrup, lemon juice, whiskey barrel bitters). If using Moonshine to formulate a normally fru-fru, girly cocktail isn’t hipster, I don’t know what is (try: being a block away from Jumbo’s Clown Room). You also have a lot of other cocktails to look forward to if you go in the near future – not discounting their inevitably delicious successors, of course. Steve also said that the menu will likely double in size once they get the opening kinks out.

Baby’s First Bourbon: Bulleit Bourbon, St. Vincents Orgeat Syrup, lemon juice, dash of Angostura bitters

Scaffa No. 1: Aviation Gin, Benedictine, Angostura bitters (neat)

Trinidad Sour: Angostura bitters, St. Vincents Orgeat Syrup, lemon juice, root liqueur

Fernet Cocktail: Fernet Branca, Canton Ginger, Carpano Antica, lime juice, Begatta ginger beer

The cocktails are all $8-11 each, which, for the ingredients and labor involved, is a steal once you taste your drink (all delicious on opening night). I’m hard-pressed to name another mixology bar that charges less than $12 per cocktail off their regular menu.

So Eastsiders: Rejoice! Harvard & Stone is open for business. You never know what cocktails are in store for you on the back bar menu nor if a band will drop by and play a surprise show. It’s just the place to enjoy a great cocktail in an industrial-chic setting, without the attitude. I cannot wait to make this my neighborhood spot.

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Harvard & Stone
5221 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90027
323.466.6063

Go Pack Go: Same-Day Bratwurst from Grindhaus LA

Beer-Marinated, Grilled Bratwurst

Hollywood is a long way from Green Bay. And when beating the cross-stateline rivals, Chicago Bears, was essential to, first, making it into the 2010-2011 playoffs and, second, making it to Super Bowl XLV, I knew I needed a good luck ritual to help my team win the NFC Championships last week. I needed a good luck food.

My lack of planning meant that I forgot to mail-order the Sheboygan brats ahead of time. Instead of going to the supermarket for Johnsonville, I decided to channel my fandom through locally-made sausages, instead. I figured my Wisconsin meat-packing counterparts would understand, since I’d be saving shipping fuel and time. After all, freshness is key, and always has been the priority – even as a matter of spoilage thanks to high fat content in bratwurst, with the earliest recipes dating back to the 1400s.

Marinating Bratwursts

I stopped in the brand new, brick and mortar sausage shop known as Grindhaus on Hollywood Blvd. to see what was ready in their case. Italian sausage, bockwurst, pickled vegetables were all available, but of course, the bratwurst were sold out. I was lucky in that they were working on another batch. When I asked about their sauerkraut, they were also working on it then – but said it’d be ready and done fermenting in 8 days. I returned 2.5 hours later to get the first of the new batch of brats. They cost a reasonable $6/lb, which yielded 6 sausages for about $10.50. If my experience taught a lesson, phone in if you have specific tastes to see what they have in stock. They are allegedly rolling out their food truck very soon and will be roaming the eastside, so I can’t wait to taste their prepared food on-the-go.

Since my brats were completed literally a few minutes beforehand, one of the three friendly Grindhaus guys present advised to leave them in my fridge, uncovered, for a few hours so that the meat would settle and harden a bit inside the fresh casing. Done. And then it was time to start the ritual of marinating them overnight. Below is the marinade recipe I used, which I’m in no way touting as the best out there, nor is the method I used. I have a lot more experimentation to do before I cross that bridge. But these fresh brats from Grindhaus turned out so tasty, I was extremely proud of my somewhat haphazard method. Maybe this method will work for you, too.

(Recipe after the jump.)

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Hemingway’s Lounge: Where Elementary to Elegant Imbibers Mix

Whistle Pig Rye Manhattan

A few weeks ago, I had the privilege of joining Dan of Thirsty in LA, Caroline on Crack and John of Social Domain LA in taste-testing Hemingway’s Lounge Director of Cocktails Alex Straus’ new winter cocktail menu. Alex’s renditions of winter cheer did not disappoint.

Hemingway's Nog

For one, my favorite drink on that menu has to be the Hemingway’s Nog, made with Atlantico Rum, Licor 43, creme fraiche, Tiki bitters, grated nutmeg and love. It’s the perfect adult nog that is extra comforting to your palate yet won’t give you that stomach ache like you got at your grandmother’s after too many glasses. Atlantico, a blend of Dominican Republic small batch rum, is the perfect spirit and the creme fraiche is the perfect substitute for the milk and cream. The cocktail is so light yet savory to the froth.

If you’re looking for something more aromatic and English, go with the Chamomile-infused Gin Martini, made complete with chamomile-infused Junipero, Dolin Blanc vermouth, Regan’s Orange Bitters and flamed orange. The florals are accentuated nicely by the citrus, making this particular gin martini another one of my favorites on the new menu.

Whiskey Warmer

Feeling like a hot toddy? The Whiskey Warmer is most excellent. Made with Elijah Craig 12, St. Elizabeth allspice dram, maple syrup, fresh lemon juice, hot water and ground cinnamon, the warm drink takes me from Hollywood to Mammoth in one sip. In fact, I believe I’ll be bringing more than my snowboard on my next trip up and will try to re-create this deliciously comforting, soothing cocktail.

Speaking of favorites in general, there were so many other cocktails that were superbly made for us – like the Moveable Feast (rye whiskey, sage, berry, honey, lemon and The Bon Vivants Tomahawk Bitters) and an impromptu cocktail with Coruba Dark Rum, Appleton Estate Reserve, Smith & Cross, lemon, lime, pineapple and and St. Vincent’s Orgeat – but I really have to cut to the chase. We all had to have a Manhattan, and it was my first time having it made with Whistle Pig Rye. It was incredible, and I’ll leave it at the fact that I have had it 3 times since this tasting.

Interior of Hemingway's Lounge (Photo credit: Hemingway's)

I’d be remiss to omit that Hemingway’s Lounge is a rather unique space to enjoy great cocktails for all the wrong reasons. Okay, here’s one right reason: The interior is beautiful, with books and typewriters lining the walls straight up to the ceilings. Here’s another: Muriel Hemingway expressly gave the bar her blessing to use the family name, giving credence that the bar is an appropriate tribute and not a knock-off. And now for the rest: It’s on Hollywood Boulevard, where no drinking establishment is exempt from patrons who willingly line up 5 deep to order “vodka-sodas with a splash of Red Bull” (I personally witnessed this on a Saturday night I was seeking some entertainment in the English language on the day I had flown back in from Taiwan). But Alex Straus is a mixologist-bartender who thrives in this industry and environment – even when it’s 10 deep. After all, one’s shaker arms can only take so much. As one who avoids reservations and bars in general on Friday and Saturday nights (amateur hour), I have to say that it is completely worth it to see Alex or one of his guys on the weekday (Tuesdays, Wednesdays) and/or as early in the night as possible. For beer drinkers, Hemingway’s has only taps, no bottles – with a non-Hollywood price point ($5-6), to boot (list). The bar’s soundtrack is solid, with classic rock, funk and even jazz dominating the playlist. Impressive.

If someone told me that my new favorite neighborhood cocktail bar would be on Hollywood Blvd., I would have scoffed at one point. But for the first time since moving to Hollywood (and luckily walking distance to Hemingway’s), I felt that the people in the 20 foot line outside this bar were sitting on a goldmine – and not just another joint pumping out spicy tuna at 180 BPM. It’s not my fault if they don’t recognize it; save those shaker arms for me, please!

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Tuesday – Friday

8 PM – 2 AM

Saturday

10 PM -2 AM

Closed Sundays and Mondays

Hemingway’s Lounge
6356 Hollywood Boulevard
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323.469.0040

Taste of East Rivals Its Scene And Style

Oysters on the half with Vietnamese mignonette, yuzu gelée & pickled onion

All photography courtesy of Andrew Herrold

East is not the kind of place that, upon drive-by, would make me turn my head while noting to come back or even to simply do more research. If it’s a Japanese Pan-Asian place on Hollywood Blvd., I’ve basically assumed it’s Geisha House or the recently-shuttered Club DSushi (which is actually on Sunset Blvd but pretty darned close). I have a stock montage that I play in my head – slow motion close-ups of collapsing hand cut spicy tuna rolls being shoved into lipsticked mouths as low-frequency four-on-the-floors pulsate through the venue. Having to shout over trance lasers to hear the person immediately next to you. Sake bombs. Blech. Saketinis. Blech. You know the place. The place where renditions of Miyagi’s go.

I get it – it’s hard to imagine Hollywood Blvd. as a culinary destination. I wouldn’t argue with you there. But then, I think, it would be unwise to completely extract that scene from the identity of a restaurant like East. During my visit, I sat across from Rob Dyrdek (for all you extreme sports fans). Celebrity or not, the guy was on to something, here – the restaurant actually doesn’t rest upon its Hollywood Blvd. laurels and serves up reliable seafood on the half – and will even impress you with its minimal, classy interior.

Warm spinach, arugula, shiitake mushrooms, duck confit, Bali pepper tossed in sherry vinaigrette. Topped with crispy pancetta and roasted young candy beets.

Let me stress again: Don’t come here looking for a bargain. Bring your date here because while you may want to throw her off with the exterior and location of yet another typical Hollywood spot, East will surprise her with classy, minimal decor and some amazingly good dishes. Keven Alan Lee heads the kitchen, hails from Vegas’ Lutèce and let’s face it – there are some you want to impress outside of business and East is the place to take him or her. Even the starting spinach salad with arugula and duck confit was very good – a good amuse to precede the seafood to come.

And do concentrate on the shellfish – not so much the sashimi (“We do sashimi, not sushi” I was told).

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NFL Gametime Specials at 25 Degrees

NFL25Degrees

Who and where’s your NFL team playing this weekend? Just when I thought I had no reason to watch since the Packers are having their bye week, 25 Degrees‘ PR shoots me one of these. Whether you’re eyeing the $2.50 PBR (you can tell me later) or the half-off their other beer selection of Miller, Stella Artois, Guinness, Hef and Amstel Light – I’m curious myself to try the buffalo and spicy soy bbq wings that aren’t normally on their menu. Nor the chili cheese fries, that is. One thing I do know is that I’ve always loved the tiny, french-cut french fries at 25 Degrees so we’ll see how their chili and cheese are.

I know what you’re thinking – too bad the burgers aren’t on special. I’ll make this easy for you – a burger is probably what you should be ordering, whether on special or not, anyway. Also, the Guinness Milkshake. So yes, this is just a ploy to get you in there to watch the game. But at least I’m honest. Anyway, I’ve been growing a second stomach, lately! Nothing’s off-limits!

UPDATE:

I got an update on pricing. See below for the damage:

$2.50 PBR cans
Half-off all other beer = $3.50 bottles and draft
$8 half-dozen wings (Buffalo and Spicy Soy BBQ)
$12 dozen wings
$10 plate of chili cheese fries
 

25 Degrees
(Bottom of Roosevelt Hotel)
7000 Hollywood Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90028
323.785.7244

Just look at the bun…