Persimmon Kimchi at Kimchi 101

Persimmon Kimchi

Last week, I was lucky enough to be invited to the headquarters of CHAM Korean Bistro (Pasadena) and iT! Jeans for a kimchi pickling workshop. We were treated to CHAM cocktails made with sparkling wine, yuzu, Korean Makgeolli as well as tofu rice pockets filled with everything from kimchi (and candied anchovies) to seaweed salad, pepper-encrusted ahi tuna and salted and roasted kale chips. It was a dinner filled with Korean fusion delight.

Chef EJ Jeong during her Kimchi 101 demo

For the learning portion, we got a demonstration on how CHAM makes their kimchi, with recipes and instruction straight from Chef EJ Jeong (formerly of A.O.C. and BOA). Check Cathy of Gastronomyblog‘s great write-up of the Napa Cabbage kimchi we were all taught to make.

After our appetizers, kimchi lesson and delicious main course (pork shoulder, cabbage kimchi, salted shrimp and sesame leaves) – we got a taste of a different kind of kimchi, which ended up being my favorite of the night: Persimmon kimchi! The recipe for this is actually the same as the traditional cabbage kimchi, save for the elimination of salted shrimp. It became intuitive that fishy, salty persimmons are not appetizing. But the subtle and firm sweetness of the persimmon is paired so perfectly with the chili flavoring I’ve learned to love in Korean kimchi. It was like a live, Korean version of the Trader Joe’s dried chili red mangos that are so popular. An interesting tip with this recipe is to use unripe persimmons, because they will actually ripen as they are fermenting in their container and in your refrigerator!

Chef EJ Jeong’s Persimmon Kimchi Recipe

Ingredients:
2 lb peeled persimmons
12 oz kimchi marinade

Kimchi mixture

Kimchi marinade ingredients:1 cup sweet rice powder
5 cups purified water
2 lb radish
4 oz minari
4 oz kat (red mustard)
4 oz Korean chives (thinner than Chinese chives)
5 oz garlic
10 oz Asian pear (peeled)
9 oz onion (peeled)
1 oz ginger (peeled)
1 cup Taeyangcho rd chili pepper powder (coarse)
1/4 cup anchovy fish sauce (Korean)
3/4 cup salted shrimp sauce (Korean)
4 oz fresno
4 oz green onion

Preparation & Procedure: How to make porridge
Mix puried water with sweet rice powder, dissolving the power until there are no lumps. Heat the water and rice powder mixture over the stovetop, stirring occasionally to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pot. When it starts to form bubbles, reduce heat and stir continuously. Once the mixture becomes thicker and is translucent, turn the heat off. The process from once the mixture is heated to when it becomes the correct consistency and color takes approximately ten minutes. Cool down completely.

Preparation & Procedure
Mix together.
Enjoy!

 
I’m no hotshot in the kitchen, but I plan on giving persimmon kimchi a try. And if you feel so inclined to get your own kimchi education, CHAM is luckily going to be hosting another workshop on Saturday. You’ll get to take home your own jar of cabbage kimchi so you can leave it in your refrigerator to ferment for at least 20 days before eating. It’s the workshop that keeps on giving!

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Saturday, November 20, 2010

11:30 AM to 2:30 PM

$40 per person – includes Korean tapas, a cocktail, and kimchi to take home.

Making Kimchi with Chef EJ Jeong
Cham Bistro R&D Kitchen
5251 S. Santa Fe Avenue
Vernon, CA 90058

Email [email protected] Class is capped at 20 people

Perishable: Everything’s Popping Up Pickles

Soon, you will do this too | Photo credit to sifu_renka on Flickr

Ohhh, I love pickles. I may even love certain vegetables more after being pickled, depending on my cheek puckering mood. Kraut, beets, peppers, onions, radishes – give ’em all to me. It’s one of the preparations that so many ethnicities share while differing in the processes themselves.

Fortunately, it all doesn’t have to be completely lost on us. Chicks with Knives will be hosting a “Pop-Up Pickle Shop” at the one and only Starry Kitchen in Downtown LA this upcoming Sunday, September 12th in the late morning.

It’ll cost you just $5 for entry, which includes a cooking demo at 11 AM by the gals themselves, and you’ll get the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned. Pickling mix ($2) and pickling kits ($20) will be available for purchase. And if learning to better consume pickles is what it’s about (I’m raising my hand here), there are also a variety of pickles for sale ($6-8).

The complimentary apps and drinks that will be available during the Pop-Up Pickle Shop are reason enough:

  • Pickle-Barrel Martini
  • Golden Beet & Goat Cheese Bites
  • Bacon-Jam Tartlettes
  • Curried Asian Pear & Grilled Chicken Skewers
  • Mini Mac n’ Cheese with Fennel/Flower Pickles

Since there are limited quantities, I recommend getting there early. Just remember: These pickles are indeed “perishable” because these veggies aren’t hot-processed nor canned and should be consumed within 2 weeks. Guess the canning workshop will have to wait.

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Sunday, September 12, 2010

10 AM – 1 PM
11 AM Cooking demo

Entry $5
Jars $6 – 8
Cash only

Complimentary appetizers & drinks

Pickle Site

Starry Kitchen
350 S. Grand Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90071