Food Trend: Bone Luging Is Actually Delicious

Step 3: Bone Luge (by Robbie)

Bone Luging. Have you heard of it? Maybe you have, and maybe you haven’t, but I’m confident in saying it’s the latest, hottest thing in food-cocktail trends.

Step 1: Consume bone marrow

I take food seriously. I take cocktails seriously. Food trends? Not so much. Let’s not confuse them. But I don’t take myself so seriously as to say that I’m so above any phenomenon without closer examination.

The process is simple: Order bone marrow. Eat bone marrow and leave the bone. Take one shot of desired spirit (a fellow bone luger helps here) and pour down the channel of the hollow bone while your mouth hangs eagerly on the opposite side of the “luge.” (The shot picks up the flavors of the bone during its travels.) Enjoy.

A trend that has arisen a few months ago (yes, it’s that “stale” already) out of Jacob Grier’s Portland, bone luging was something that intrigued me because: 1) I love bone marrow. And while I still have a few food-curious friends who are getting acclimated to the idea of it, I always have enjoyed those umami scoops of that gelatinous center. Yes – even without the crostini. 2) I love shots of (key:) good spirits. Okay, or fortified wine, if you want to get technical with me, here.

Add to the above: The combination of a quality, well-paired spirit with unctuous bone marrow has to be greater than the sum of its parts, no? I guess there will always be the eye rolling haters detractors. And there are the curious mainstream. The health proponents and enthusiasts. And of course, there will be the fanatics and the pros.

Step 2: Pour shots of desired sherry

As they say: Don’t knock it without trying it. And I did, on my recent stint to that other city over there on that other coast – at Prime Meats, one of my favorite restaurants, no less. And it was delicious. I believe the key factor in bone luging being classified as an all-out fad vs. arguable trend is which spirit/wine is used in the shot. Thankfully I was in good hands, as Sother Teague (@creativedrunk) poured shots of Oloroso Sherry for my friend Robbie and I to luge with. As Sother explained, since sherry is closer to a wine, it’s sweeter and better than using a really brash spirit because it works well with the unctious bone marrow taste. And I have to say, the bone marrow really added some fatty finesse to that shot.

So where can you bone luge in Los Angeles, fearless readers? Bar | Kitchen in Downtown LA. (You can spy Daniel of Thirsty in LA, Chris Bostick of The Varnish and Zara of Providence doing “Fertreuse” luges here – that is, with Buffalo Trace Single Oak Project 131 & 132, Fernet & Angostoura shots.) If you don’t mind guiding your bartender and accompanying kitchen, maybe even try Lexington Social House – or if you’re brave, Wolfgang Puck’s CUT, which is known for some of the best bone marrow in the city. Bone luging is for the brave, not for the shy, because there will be lots of attention and questions! If you’re lucky, you’ll get the disgusted looks.

I’m sold on the novelty. Not so much the tequila bone luge shot, though I haven’t tried it yet. And yes, it’s a novelty, because I’m not about to get mad at a cocktail bar because its kitchen doesn’t serve bone marrow. Just make sure you’ve got the right shot, and if you enjoyed eating the bone marrow in the first place and step, the luge action may make your selection a shot of heaven.

Past coverage: Brooklyn, NY: Prime Meats is Simply Divine

Bar | Kitchen at O Hotel
819 S Flower St
Los Angeles, CA 90017
213.784.3048

Prime Meats
465 Court St
Brooklyn, NY 11231
718.254.0327

November Sweets at Nobu

Looking for a November nightcap?

I know what you’re thinking – November puts you in the mood for pumpkin pie & spice, and a sushi restaurant normally isn’t the place you’d go to get that. But for this month, only – Nobu West Hollywood is serving up a specially-made dessert that comes with a shot. Yes, the Japanese have pumpkins too! Peep below for the absolutely delicious dessert I tried last week:

Kabocha (Japanese pumpkin) creme, vanilla caramel, caramelized Kabocha seeds, topped with coconut/caramel ice cream

The shot:

Finlandia grapefruit vodka, spicy pumpkin puree, condensed milk and garnished with nutmeg.

The coconut/caramel ice cream was so delicious with the Kabocha creme and the crispy carmelized seeds gave it good crunch. But the best part is actually the shot (have a little sip with each bite you take), which finishes off the dessert in a whole other way. Yes, it’s made with grapefruit vodka so there’s a nice, refreshing base while giving you that autumn, savory creaminess you’ve come to expect from pumpkin pie.

Oh, I’m sorry – did you want bites to eat before dessert? Nobu is notorious for some seriously delicious tapas – hot and cold. It’s pretty easy to pop in and sit down in the lounge area so you don’t have to mess with the stress of a reservation. I myself like to play it by ear. 😉

Hot tapas:

Wagyu and foie gras gyozas (3 pc) $10
Scallop with jalapeño salsa (2 pc) $8
Miso black cod with butter lettuce (2 pc) $8
Uni tempura $10
Rock shrimp tempura with creamy spicy or butter ponzu sauce $7
“Fish ‘n Chips” Nobu style $8
Lamb anticucho $9
Squid pasta with light garlic sauce $9
Miso marinated grilled Black Tiger shrimp $9
Foie gras and crispy soba (2 pc) $9
Ginger panko encrusted scallops $10

Cold tapas:

Spicy taro chips with yellowfin tuna or scallop $10
Nobu style sashimi tacos with yellowfin tuna, lobster or crab (2 pc) $9
Yellowtail sashim with jalapeño $9
Whitefish sashimi with dried miso $9
Oysters with Nobu sauces (Ponzu, Nobu, Maui) $10
Lobster ceviche butter lettuce (2 pc) $12
Nobu new style sashimi – salmon, whitefish or scallop $8
Tiradito – whitefish, scallop or octopus $8
Kanpachi agua de chili $12

One thing’s for certain – I have my eye on the foie gras wagyu gyozas! I think I may just have to stop in – dessert’s just not enough.

Dessert available through November – $14

Hot and cold tapas available in lounge all day

Nobu
903 N. La Cienega Blvd
West Hollywood, CA 90069
310.657.5711